Week 10 at AAC

fall quarter finals(2)

Finals is almost here! Don’t stress too much, and while you’re at the library studying, check out some updates, activities, events, and performances during week 10.

Changing Library Hours

Starting at 10am on Sunday, November 12, AAC will be open 24 hours a day. Regular hours will resume on Monday, November 20 when the library closes at 2 a.m. On Wednesday, November 22 the library will close at 6 p.m., and we’ll be closed for the Thanksgiving break until Monday, November 27.

Zero Waste Finals (November 13-17)

Zero Waste Finals at the AAC are November 13th through 17th and we’re aiming to achieve a high diversion rate!  What does that mean?  It means that the library is hoping to divert as much as possible of the building’s compostable and recyclable waste from the landfill.  Will you help us achieve our goal?

Find more information here: https://dulibraries.wordpress.com/2017/11/06/zero-waste-finals-fall-2017/

Midnight Coffee (November 15-16)

Get your caffeine buzz on November 15 and November 16 from 8 p.m. to midnight at AAC. The Front Porch Cafe will serve free drip coffee during those times to keep your study sessions going.

Jazz in the Library (November 14)

Join us for a few minutes or for an hour to listen to the Jazz Choir Ensemble from the Lamont School of Music perform on November 14 starting at 7:00 p.m. The concert will be held in the AAC 290 Special Events Room.

Stress Relief (November 15)

On November 15, University Libraries and the Health and Counseling Center are hosting a Stress Relief Event in the Anderson Academic Commons room 290 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. We will have therapy dogs, massage therapists, an acupuncturist, crafts, and snacks.

Lamont Chorale Performance (November 16)

The University of Denver Lamont Chorale will perform a short concert on the balcony of the second floor on November 16 at 3:00 p.m. This short concert will feature three acapella songs to brighten your day. Stop by and enjoy. Please note, this is a public performance in the open space of the AAC.

Special Collections Closed

Special Collections and Archives is being renovated November 8 2017-December 22 2017. The University is closed from December 25-January 2 2018. We can accommodate limited in-person visits with advance notice during renovation. Questions? Call the main desk: 303-871-3428.

Posted in News & Events

Zero Waste Finals – Fall 2017

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Help the Library to Aim High

Zero Waste Finals at the AAC are November 13th through 17th and we’re aiming to achieve a high diversion rate!  What does that mean?  It means that the library is hoping to divert as much as possible of the building’s compostable and recyclable waste from the landfill.  Will you help us achieve our goal?

Questions about Zero Waste Finals?

If you are unsure about where to put your trash, or want to know more about composting and recycling, an information table will be staffed by volunteers to answer your questions on Monday, Wednesday and Friday (11/13, 15, 17) from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m., and Tuesday and Thursday (11/14,16) from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Look for us at the table on the main level, next to the Front Porch Café and across from the Lending Desk.  We’ll also have a panel with examples of common compostable, recyclable, and landfill items located next to the information table.

 

What about that Coffee Cup?

Good news! If you bought your coffee at the Front Porch Café, Beans, or another Sodexo venue (or if the cup says compostable or has the BPI compost logo), then you can compost your coffee cup in the green compost bins. Unfortunately, if your coffee is from Starbucks, Kaladi, Einsteins, or does not say compostable, then the cup is landfill due to its liner. Not all is lost–you can still recycle the lid and deposit the cardboard sleeve in either a recycling or compost container.

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Want to know more about Climate Change? Continue reading

Posted in News & Events

October Events

The quarter is halfway over and the campus is cooling down. Don’t fret about midterms, and know that University Libraries is here for you. We have great events coming up this month.

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University of Denver (DU) men’s ice hockey players (left to right) George Congrave, Murray Massier (Center), and Jim Brown (Wing) pose in their uniforms with hockey sticks in the ready position on the ice rink at the Field House Arena in Denver, Colorado.

October 20 – Special Collections Homecoming Open House

Join us to celebrate Homecoming Weekend with an Open House of Special Collections. An exhibit on DU History and Sports will be available through the month of October, and on October 20, 2017 additional objects will be out for view to recognize DU Homecoming.

 

 

 

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October 26 – An Inconvenient Sequel

Join us on October 26, 2017 at 4:30 p.m. to watch An Inconvenient Sequel, hosted by University Libraries and the Center for Sustainability in Lindsey Auditorium Sturm 281. The film will be preceded by a live webcast of Al Gore answering questions from schools across the country, and a panel discussion with faculty from the Department of Natural Sciences & Mathematics will follow the film.

A decade after An Inconvenient Truth (2006) brought the climate crisis into the heart of popular culture, comes the riveting and rousing follow-up that shows just how close we are to a real energy revolution. Former Vice President Al Gore continues his tireless fight, traveling around the world training an army of climate champions and influencing international climate policy. Cameras follow him behind the scenes — in moments both private and public, funny and poignant — as he pursues the inspirational idea that while the stakes have never been higher, the perils of climate change can be overcome with human ingenuity and passion.

Faculty from Natural Sciences & Mathematics will hold a panel discussion, featuring:

Jonathan Ormes, Research Professor, Physics & Astronomy

Patrick Martin, Associate Professor/Kurtz Chair, Biological Sciences & The Chester M Alter Arboretum

Paul Sutton, Professor, Geography

Rebecca Powell, Associate Professor, Geography

Seating is limited, so please register for the event here: http://bit.ly/2fNihz5

Send your questions for Al Gore to us before October 20 for a chance to submit a video entry.

For additional information or questions, contact Elia Trucks, elia.trucks@du.edu

 

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October 30 – Troll in the Library Scavenger Hunt

A troll has been let loose in the library! Join us on October 30, 2017 at 7:00 p.m. in the Anderson Academic Commons for a magical night of mystery, games, arts and crafts, and treats when we follow clues to the troll in the library, starting from AAC 290 Special Events Room.

Win candy and prizes from the Scavenger Hunt starting at 7:30 p.m., and play games like Lego Harry Potter, scrabble, more. Get sorted into your proper house and make buttons, bookmarks, or collages with your housemates.

Sign up for the scavenger hunt here: http://bit.ly/2w5kuwe

 

For questions and more information, contact Student Outreach Librarian Elia Trucks, elia.trucks@du.eduelia.trucks@du.edu.

Posted in News & Events

Banned Books Week 2017: September 24 – September 30

Facebook1bEach year, libraries and bibliophiles everywhere observe Banned Books Week and celebrate the freedom to read. Books are constantly challenged for presenting controversial, unorthodox, or unpopular elements, and the book community comes together annually to fight censorship and protect intellectual freedom.

The American Library Association’s Office of Intellectual Freedom publishes a Top 10 list of the most-challenged books each year. The 2016 list can be found below, with links to each title that the University of Denver currently has in our collection. Celebrate your freedom to read and check one out this week!

  1. This One Summer written by Mariko Tamaki and illustrated by Jillian Tamaki
    Reasons: challenged because it includes LGBT characters, drug use and profanity, and it was considered sexually explicit with mature themes
  2. Drama written and illustrated by Raina Telgemeier
    Reasons: challenged because it includes LGBT characters, was deemed sexually explicit, and was considered to have an offensive political viewpoint
  3. George written by Alex Gino
    Reasons: challenged because it includes a transgender child, and the “sexuality was not appropriate at elementary levels”
  4. I Am Jazz written by Jessica Herthel and Jazz Jennings, and illustrated by Shelagh McNicholas
    Reasons: challenged because it portrays a transgender child and because of language, sex education, and offensive viewpoints
  5. Two Boys Kissing written by David Levithan
    Reasons: challenged because its cover has an image of two boys kissing, and it was considered to include sexually explicit LGBT content
  6. Looking for Alaska written by John Green
    Reasons: challenged for a sexually explicit scene that may lead a student to “sexual experimentation”
  7. Big Hard Sex Criminals written by Matt Fraction and illustrated by Chip Zdarsky
    Reason: challenged because it was considered sexually explicit
  8. Make Something Up: Stories You Can’t Unread written by Chuck Palahniuk
    Reasons: challenged for profanity, sexual explicitness, and being “disgusting and all around offensive”
  9. Little Bill (series) written by Bill Cosby and and illustrated by Varnette P. Honeywood
    Reason: challenged because of criminal sexual allegations against the author
  10. Eleanor & Park written by Rainbow Rowell
    Reason: challenged for offensive language

Find out more about Banned Books Week at the Official Banned Books Week ALA website. Artwork courtesy of the American Library Association.

Posted in News & Events

Welcome Back Pios! September Book Displays

Happy first day of school! Take some time between your new classes and studies to check out some of our book displays for the month.

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– Hillbilly Elegy / Appalachia – 

To support the One Book One DU Initiative for Hillbilly Elegy, September’s book display focuses on the Appalachia region. Novels, poetry, and nonfiction explore this important region’s culture, history, industries, and struggles. Affrilachian authors, a multicultural group that encompass many diverse viewpoints and lived histories in the Appalachian region, will be the focus of the display to boost their unique voices. The display includes works by Affrilachian poets, memoirs and stories of growing up in Appalachia, and books on the region’s history. Take a look through these books and start discovering this fascinating part of our country.

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– Latinx Heritage Month – 

Latino or latina? How about Latinx? Latinx is a gender neutral term for Latino/ Latina that allows for many groups of people to be included and represented. The month between September 15 and October 15 celebrates the histories, cultures, and contributions of Latinx people. In support of the Latino Student Alliance, this display explores books with uniquely Latinx themes.

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– DU Community Publications –

DU’s faculty and staff are amazing! Check out what they’re publishing in their respective fields. You’ll find books on race, gender, economics, literature, and more!

 

Find out more about these displays including book lists and our DVD display here: http://libguides.du.edu/bookdisplay

Posted in News & Events

Wartime Wedding

Hattie_Carnegie_1955WikipediaBy Photographer-John Engstead, Beverly Hills

Hattie Carnegie, 1955 Photographed by John Engstead

An internationally known milliner, fashion designer and manufacturer, Hattie Carnegie’s designs were the epitome of high fashion. But even a fashion icon was not impervious to the constraints brought on by the war. With many everyday items rationed, fabric included, any overabundance would have been considered un-American.

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Bobbe Oberfelder and Hank Masarky, August 30, 1944

Thus, it was not uncommon during WWII for brides to wear suits or suit dresses.  When Bobbe Oberfelder wed Hank Masarky in 1944, she wore a dress by Hattie Carnegie that resembled the designer’s signature ‘little Carnegie suit.’  The peplum inspired waist, straight skirt and decorative beaded buttons were common features of Hattie’s designs.

The dress was purchased at Neusteters Department Store in Denver. Neusteters was widely regarded a women’s fashion hot spot in the West and carried designs by Hattie Carnegie. When Bobbe Oberfelder needed something to wear for her wedding, the owners of Neusteter’s opened the store after-hours especially for Bobbe.

Learn more about this story and view this dress with the grooms suit on the Main Floor of the Anderson Academic Commons.

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Wedding Party from left to right: Major Linton Simerl, Bobbe Oberfelder Masarky, Hank Masarky, Shirley Neusteter, and Arthur Oberfelder at the Oberfelder’s Denver home in 1944.

 

 

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Happy American Artist Appreciation Month!

August is the month when we celebrate American Artists, and today’s feature is Irene Miller Stein.

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Irene Stein worked as professional artist well into her 90s, seen here at age 94 looking through one of her glass pieces. She worked in many different media and styles, from art-deco in the 1920s and 1930s to modern, abstract sculptures and computer generated art in the 1970s and 1980s.

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Irene Miller (Mrs. Azriel) Stein was born in Denver, Colorado in 1894 to Anna and Robert Lazar Miller, both pioneers of Denver’s Jewish community.

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She attended the Art Institute of Chicago. In 1921 she married Azriel Stein, born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1896 and moved to Denver with his family at the age of 14. Azriel ”Azie” Stein, and his brother-in-law Joe Peterman (Sophie Miller’s husband), founded, owned, and operated Pencol Drug Store on the corner of Pennsylvania Street and Colfax Avenue in Denver. Irene and Azriel’s son Stanley was born in 1928. Azriel Stein died in 1976.

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Stein worked in many different mediums over her career including printmaking, glass and metal sculpture. Here she is welding at age 84.

Check out more about Irene Miller Stein in the DU Archives and the Rocky Mountain Jewish History on the Facebook page.

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